Advisory Board

Kate Klonick

Kate Klonick is an Associate Professor at St. John’s University Law School, a fellow at the Brookings Institution and Yale Law School’s Information Society Project. Her writing on online speech, freedom of expression, and private internet platform governance has appeared in the Harvard Law Review, Yale Law Journal, The New Yorker, the New York Times, The Atlantic, the Washington Post and numerous other publications. For the 2022-2023 academic year, she is in residence in Cambridge as a Visiting Scholar at the Rebooting Social Media Institute at Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center.

Inaya Folarin Iman

Inaya Folarin Iman is a writer, broadcast journalist and campaigner. She is the Founder and Director of The Equiano Project, a forum to promote freedom of speech and open dialogue on the subjects of race, identity and culture. She is on the Board of Advisors for the Foundation Against Intolerance and Racism (FAIR) and is the Cultural Management and Youth Engagement Trustee for the National Portrait Gallery.
She was the creator and host of The Discussion, a weekly ideas, culture and politics TV show on GB News and writes regular columns in The Telegraph, The Sunday Telegraph and Spiked magazine.
She has also helped found and deliver numerous freedom of speech initiatives including Index on Censorship’s Free Speech Is For Me, the Free Speech Union and the Free Speech Champions project.

John Seigenthaler

John Seigenthaler is an award-winning communications professional, a former anchor and Special Correspondent for NBC News.  John is now a Managing Partner for the global communications and public relations agency Finn Partners.

He anchored NBC Nightly News with John Seigenthaler on Saturday and Sunday for more than a decade.  During his time at NBC News John has covered presidential campaigns, political conventions, natural disasters, terror attacks in Europe, the middle east and in New York on 9/11.  He was the first anchor chosen to help launch MSNBC cable channel in 1996.  In addition, he on appeared other TV news programs including Meet The Press, Dateline, TODAY, CNBC and the Discovery Channel. He also spent 3 years as Primetime News Anchor for the cable news channel Aljazeera America.

John has been a vocal advocate for free speech and the U.S. First Amendment in his work with the Newseum in Washington, D.C.   He is a former member of the Newseum Institute Board of Trustees. He also chairs the Peabody Awards Board of Jurors and is a judge for the RFK Journalism Awards.  He holds a B.A. degree in Public Policy Studies from Duke University.

Nathan Law

Nathan Law is a young Hong Kong activist, currently in exile and based in London. During the Umbrella Movement in 2014, Nathan was one of the five representatives who took part in the dialogue with the government, debating political reform. Upholding non-violent civic actions, Nathan, Joshua Wong and other student leaders founded Demosistō in 2016 and ran for the Legislative Council election. Nathan was elected with 50,818 votes in the Hong Kong Island constituency and became the youngest Legislative Councilor in history. Yet his seat was overturned in July 2017 following Beijing’s constitutional reinterpretation, despite international criticism. Nathan was later jailed for his participation in the Umbrella Movement. The persecution sparked global concern over Beijing’s crackdown on human rights and democratic movement in Hong Kong.In 2018, Nathan and his fellow student activists Joshua Wong and Alex Chow are nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize by US congressmen and British parliament members. Due to the risk imposed by the draconian National Security Law, Nathan left Hong Kong and continues to speak up for Hong Kong people on the international level. In 2020, he was listed as one of the 100 most influential people in the world by TIME. In March 2021, he was named a Pritzker Fellow at the University of Chicago’s Institute of Politics. In December 2021, Nathan was invited as the only speaker from Hong Kong in “Summit for Democracy” hosted by the Biden administration, and delivered a speech which reminds everyone how important our democratic values and freedoms are.

Faisal Saeed Al Mutar

Faisal Saeed Al Mutar experienced the villainy of extremism and authoritarian regimes firsthand. He survived the Iraq Civil War, the murder of his brother, and several kidnapping attempts before becoming a refugee in the United States in 2013.

A practitioner of countering extremism and misinformation on an international scale, he’s traveled to conferences and spoken on campuses across the globe on his experiences working to create an alternative positive change in the region. He founded the organization Ideas Beyond Borders, a non-profit dedicated to empowering people across the globe with access to new ideas and fresh perspectives.

Faisal received the President’s Volunteer Service Award from President Obama and currently serves on the leadership council at the World Liberty Congress.

Sources: Ideas Beyond Borders website and Foundation Against Intolerance and Racism (FAIR).

Agustina Del Campo

Agustina Del Campo is an international human rights consultant and the Director of the Center for Studies on Freedom of Expression and Access to Information (CELE) at Universidad de Palermo. Del Campo earned her LL.M. in International Legal Studies from American University Washington College of Law, where she led the Impact Litigation Project and coordinated research and litigation of several freedom of expression cases before the Inter-American Commission and Court on Human Rights. She is a Fulbright Research Fellow at Columbia University (2015) and a member of the think tank of the Global Free Expression Project (2012-present). She is the Vice Chair of the Global Network Initiative (GNI) and serves as an undergraduate and graduate professor of international law, human rights, and the Internet.

Sources: GNI Website, CELE, The Dialogue

Randall Kennedy

Randall Kennedy is Michael R. Klein Professor at Harvard Law School where he teaches courses on contracts, criminal law, and the regulation of race relations. He was born in Columbia, South Carolina. For his education he attended St. Albans School, Princeton University, Oxford University, and Yale Law School. He served as a law clerk for Judge J. Skelly Wright of the United States Court of Appeals and for Justice Thurgood Marshall of the United States Supreme Court. He is a member of the bar of the District of Columbia and the Supreme Court of the United States. Awarded the 1998 Robert F. Kennedy Book Award for Race, Crime, and the Law, Mr Kennedy writes for a wide range of scholarly and general interest publications. His other books are For Discrimination: Race, Affirmative Action, and the Law (2013), The Persistence of the Color Line: Racial Politics and the Obama Presidency (2011), Sellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal (2008), Interracial Intimacies: Sex, Marriage, Identity, and Adoption (2003), and Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word (2002). A member of the American Law Institute, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Association, Mr. Kennedy is also a Trustee emeritus of Princeton University.